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Ephraim Amu

Ephraim Amu

Ephraim Kɔku Amu was a Ghanaian composer, musicologist and teacher

1899

Born
13 September 1899

Born

He was born on 13 September 1899 at Peki-Avetile in the Peki Traditional Area of the Volta Region and as a male child born on a Wednesday was called Kɔku

1920

Early life and education
20 July 1920

Early life and education

Ephraim Kɔku Amu's parents were Stephen Amuyaa, a wood carver known as Papa Stefano, and Sarah Akoram Ama; he showed an early interest in music and agriculture, and after attending school, he learned organ playing from his music teacher in exchange for working on the teacher's farm, eventually completing his teacher-catechist training in 1919 and delivering a sermon in both Twi and Ewe languages.

1920

Work and music
20 July 1920

Work and music

After completing his training, Ephraim Kɔku Amu traveled to Peki-Blengo E.P. Middle Boarding School as a teacher, making a challenging journey on foot with a five-octave organ on his head to enhance music education at the school, and he also sought additional music lessons from Rev. Allotey-Pappoe in his eagerness to master his musical skills.

1950

Music composed
20 July 1950

Music composed

Amu's notable compositions include "Fare thee well," "Mawɔ dɔ na Yesu," "Nkwagye Dwom," "Dwonto," "Yetu Osa," "Israel Hene," "Onipa da wo ho so," "Yaanom Abibirimma," "Yen Ara Asaase Ni," and many others, with a particular emphasis on using the atenteben, a traditional Ghanaian bamboo flute, promoting and popularizing it through his compositions.

2004

Ephraim Amu Foundation
20 July 2004

Ephraim Amu Foundation

The Ephraim Amu Foundation, established in 1995, was officially inaugurated in 2004 as a tribute to Ephraim Amu's legacy.

2023

Works by Ephraim Amu
20 July 2023

Works by Ephraim Amu

The following are compositions by Ephraim Amu: "Twenty-five African Songs in the Twi Language," with music and lyrics by E. Amu, published by Sheldon Press in 1932. "Amu Choral Works," published by Waterville Publishing House in 1993. Additionally, Amu wrote an article titled "How to Study African Rhythm," which appeared in The Teachers' Journal (Accra) 6.2 in 1933, covering the years 1933-34.

2023

African influence
20 July 2023

African influence

Ephraim Kɔku Amu, a composer and musician, gained national acclaim for his patriotic song "Yen Ara Asase Ni," which became popular at national events. He was known for his unorthodox actions and ideas while working as a tutor at the Presbyterian Mission Seminary at Akropong, using African cultural artifacts and inventions and advocating for African dress and music in church services. In 1965, he was honored with an honorary degree of Doctor of Music from the University of Ghana.

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